Author Topic: competition; how much is too much?  (Read 77 times)

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Blue Pig

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competition; how much is too much?
« on: January 17, 2018, 03:17:11 PM »
     Making decisions about possible new location for next year. The is a flea market that I used to sell at before getting into this business. If you have watched that crap show flea market flip you've seen the place and me too. This market is huge anywhere from 800 to 1000 vendors every Sunday. There are a lot of food trucks here (their numbers are not included in above). The is the original hot dog stand over 30yrs there, one hot dog trailer and 3 hot dog carts, not to mention taco, bbq, cupcake, steamed burgers, donuts, coffee, lemonade, fried chicken the list goes on.
       I think I can make money here by selling everything but my hot dogs, Kielbasa, red hots and adding brats. I know my hot dogs are better than the other 5 hot dog slingers, not only my opinion btw, but I feel it's just too saturated with them to even get noticed. My plan is to have dogs with me but promote the other items heavier. Any thoughts?
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Super Weenie

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Re: competition; how much is too much?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 06:57:57 PM »
Buddy, if you can get in there for a few weekends without being obligated to pay a huge fee or sign up for a long time, go for it! You don't know if you don't try!

ps: I think you're on the right track by trying to set yourself apart from the hotdog vendors; but I think you should take them with you and de-emphasize them on the menu. List them after the sausages.
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Blue Pig

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Re: competition; how much is too much?
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2018, 11:57:09 PM »
   The dogs will definitely be available just not prominent. Nothing cheep about this market I sold there for years started at 30 a week up to 300 for a guaranteed monthly spot. Double that with the trailer. The food trucks are segregated into two outlying areas and they pay even more, but they get power and water. My cart would be on an end isle I have to call the manager closer to the season opener to get this years fees.       
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duggsdoggs

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Re: competition; how much is too much?
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2018, 12:17:46 AM »
i am not a fan of paying fees to set up but I do know a lot of vendors that do that and make more money than I do.  The other thing is if you look around you will see Burger King, McDonald's, Krystal, Sonic all of which sell hamburger and or Hot dogs but they build next door to each other and across the street so having other vendors should not be an issue.  I would do it on a trail basis and if it is not cost effective then I would move on just like testing any location.  I would also look at what the other vendors have and serve maybe something they don't have like a lobster roll or just go with your ability for service and good food.  Just what I think.  Good!! Good!!
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Blue Pig

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Re: competition; how much is too much?
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2018, 12:47:13 AM »
   That's the plan right now, if the cost aren't more than 300 for the month I'll give it 4 weeks. I don't like paying for space either and so far I've talked my way out of paying fees for all the events I've done. I just have to get my body back in gear to work from 4:30am till 3pm at the market. Thanks for the advice if it works out I should be able to cut my time on the street down to two days and be way more profitable. Thanks again guys.
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AZHotdog.com

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Re: competition; how much is too much?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2018, 03:52:47 AM »
(he arrives huffing and puffing) Whew! Mule got whithered in the mud. Hope I ain't too late.

There's what you know: not all spaces are equal. There's what I don't know. You talked about number of vendors. The crowd size here must be pretty freaking big but the first thing I'd do is divide expected crowd size by the number of entree-item vendors and now we're looking at your theoretical market. The event duration implied by the vendor numbers indicate at least a half day event, probably an all day event, possibly a multi-day event. That means 95% of the people there will buy a food item or 5.

At least with that math we might determine if another hot dog vendor can fit in there but heck man....in that competitive environment? The person who buys a hot dog is gonna want quick, cheap and simple otherwise they go to the trucks. Plus that really kinda makes us slingers not just dogs but pitbulls. That's gonna be like racing at NASCAR. Stuff the other guy into the rail, watch him crash and burn baby burn!

None of us like that scenario apparently.

I'd totally go low, hit them below the belt, go for the kids and ladies demographic. I'd go with cotton candy, snow cones, popcorn, pretzels, I like the crystal sugar rock candy on a stick, I'd back this up with beverages, I'd compete with fresh squeezed lemonade. And I'd go heavy on presentation because the prep time on all of this is minimal compared to sausages. Plus you pre-make a lot of this stuff. The presentation aspects are you keep a popcorn machine popping small batches so they can smell it, you make a few cotton candies per hour so they can see it.

Presentation. The lemon shakeup guys are mostly serving in foam cups for obvious reasons. I want to see the product because I'm gonna drop a strawberry in it and maybe a tiny splash of grenadine. Your perceived-value factor just beat everybody else. There's your product differentiation on the lemonade and it's reinforced with the light sweet female and kids theme.

I always have a kind of upscale beverage service thing in mind for these events. Fresh lemonade is on the track but they aren't getting it. There's a bigger gap to fill here. I'd like to talk more about beverage service but occasionally I swear I can hear Dugg's voice in the back of my head telling me to shut up.